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Digitalisation is crucial for the Middle East’s competitiveness — Jan Mrosik

GO DIGITAL OIL&GAS MIDDLE EAST

Digitalisation is crucial for the Middle East’s competitiveness — Jan Mrosik

The manufacturing future of the region depends on the rapid adoption of digital strategies and tools, writes Jan Mrosik, CEO, Digital Factory Division, Siemens AG for Arabian Business.

As the world becomes ever more connected, digitalisation is the key differentiator that will enable companies to remain competitive, thinks Jan Mrosik.

Digitalisation brings lower operating costs and higher quality, flexibility and efficiency. Response times to customer requests and market demands are shortened, and new business models are opened up.

Jan Mrosik, CEO, Digital Factory Division, Siemens AG

According to Mrosik, the UAE is working to increase manufacturing’s share of GDP and in Saudi Arabia, the National Transformation Plan seeks to achieve digital transformation, securing a larger role for manufacturing. Egypt, too, has set goals to raise the industrial sector’s share of the economy to more than 20 percent.

Digitalisation technologies are a differentiator, and the Middle East has the potential to use them to leapfrog the third industrial revolution, becoming a world leader in Industry 4.0, or the Industrial Internet of Things.

Firms must start their digital transformation now. Becoming a digital enterprise is no longer a vision of the future. It needs to happen now. Through a portfolio of industrial software and automation called the Digital Enterprise, companies can integrate and digitalise their entire value chain, be it in pharmaceutical, food and beverage, automotive, aerospace or any other industry. This integration and digitalisation builds an exact digital copy of the value chain: a “digital twin”.

Jan Mrosik, CEO, Digital Factory Division, Siemens AG

An intelligent virtual model, it duplicates and simulates real-world properties of products and production processes to drive huge productivity and efficiency gains.

Throughout the product lifecycle, the digital twin provides companies with the means to design, simulate, validate and optimise products, processes and even entire factories in the digital world. All generated data is stored using a common data backbone which shares this information among all stakeholders involved.

By merging the virtual and real worlds and applying Siemens’ software and automation products, Italian car manufacturer Maserati reduced its time-to-market for its Ghibli model from 30 to 16 months. Germany based Bausch + Ströbel, which builds specialised machines for the pharmaceutical industry, expects to enhance its engineering efficiency by at least 30 percent by 2020 through the use of digital twins of its machines

Jan Mrosik, CEO, Digital Factory Division, Siemens AG

But digitalisation doesn’t stop there. Data from both production and the product in use can be evaluated in real time. Therefore, we’ve created a cloud-based, open IoT operating system called MindSphere to rapidly connect devices, machines, whole facilities and even fleets to the cloud. Through applications developed by almost anyone, data is analysed and fed back into the value chain, driving better decision-making and flexibility, shortening development time and resulting in higher-quality products.

I believe building platforms to allow global players to localise technology and expertise is essential to sustainable industrialisation and knowledge transfer.

Jan Mrosik, CEO, Digital Factory Division, Siemens AG

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